Expired

Source: Danas

Fruitful warning to "forgetful" public authorities

Rodoljub Sabic

Personal opinion

About a month ago, acting as the Commissioner for the Information of Public Importance, I sent a letter addressed to 119 public authorities, warning them of their obligation to act in accordance with the instructions given in Commissioner's Decisions and of legal consequences of failure in fulfillment of such an obligation. 

Expired

Source: Blic

Rodoljub Sabic, Commissioner for Information

About a month ago, I sent a written warning to 119 public authorities about the duty to comply with the order from the decision of the Commissioner for the Information and about the consequences set by the law for failing to meet this obligation. That number, between 100 and 200 non-enforced decisions compared to about 4,500 closed cases, does not seem dramatically high either in absolute or relative terms, that is only few percent, but importance in principle of failing to comply with the order which is binding under the law must never be underestimated.

Expired

Source: Dnevnik

Rodoljub Sabic is not completely satisfied with the Draft Law on Personal Data Protection

Commissioner for Information of Public information Rodoljub Sabic said yesterday that the efforts of the Serbian Government to provide legally for the field of personal data protection were important, but he also warned that that certain proposed arrangements could thwart guaranteed protection, and they should be reconsidered, amended or eliminated. He said to the Beta agency that the Draft Law was for the most part based on the standards which were affirmed in the democratic world, but he also said that it must not be ignored that it also contains some provisions which can be the basis for thwarting or even complete getting around of personal data protection in certain cases. 

Expired

Source: Borba

By passing the Draft Law on Personal Data Protection, the Serbian Government took a crucial step towards establishing a legal mechanism which Serbia, unfortunately, does not have and which is necessary to a modern democratic society. It should, however, be pointed out that certain arrangements included in the Draft Law can present real threat for thwarting or getting around the guaranteed protection and that in the process of adoption they should be critically reconsidered, amended or eliminated. It is commendable that the Draft Law is for the most part based on the standards which were affirmed for this field a long time ago in the democratic world.

Expired

Source: Blic

Rodoljub Sabic, Commissioner for Information

Comments

The National Assembly shall soon discuss the Proposal of the Personal Data Protection Act. It is good that this is so, and it is also good that the majority of solutions from the Law Proposal rely on good European standards. However, there are also solutions for which that can not be stated in any way. For instance, for the solution from Article 45 paragraph 2 of the Law Proposal, enabling security bodies to deny due to reasons of  "state and public security" and that "until the reasons exist", to the authority that should protect the personal data insight into relevant information, even access to the premises. Simply put, citizens shall be guaranteed personal data protection by the law, from illegal "processing" by the security authorities - only if approved by those authorities. Interesting, isn't it?

Expired

Source: Vecernje novosti

In our country there are no more precise rules regarding on which documents one can put secrecy mark. Serbia and Montenegro only in Europe do not have Law on Data Secrecy Classification. 
In the paper HEADER, almost threatening was typed - "state secret". On another document the same message has been stamped.  The data are strictly protected and therefore we shall not speak about them.  Because, for disclosing the written follows punishment up to ten years in jail! 
Therefore it is no  secret, and especially not the state one, that  Serbia does not have unique law that would regulate which documents can be labeled as secret. There are, however, sanctions for disclosing data, but no one knows which  "papers" deserve to be hidden from the public eyes and locked behind seven locks.